Trey Songz Passion, Pain & Pleasure album review

Passion, Pain & Pleasure is Trey Songz’ fourth studio album. Leading with a ballad “Love Faces,” Trey sets the tone for the entire project flowing back and forth between his vocals and an R. Kelly sound that despite it’s over usage, actually works. The following track, “Massage,” is the album’s quiet storm moment that is destined to become a favorite among fans of the singer and those embarking on a journey into the artists’ music. “Massage,” follows the mood of “Invented Sex” from his Grammy nominated Ready, but suits his vocals a little better with percussion and piano breezing by in the background.
The lead single “Bottoms Up,” offers a club vibe and features Young Money rapper, Nicki Minaj. At first listen, it becomes one of the most memorable off of the seventeen cut collection as does “Can’t Be Friends,” where Trey sings his heart out about a love turned friendship that can be no more. “Please Return My Call,” continues the same saga of yearned romance while “Red Lipstick,” adds to the album title’s momentum with its bedroom swag, as does “Doorbell.”
“The Unusual,” fits the inevitable radio friendly format with rapper Drake adding to the cut. Despite its radio attractiveness, the beat borders on bizarre and distracts from the lyricism of Trey’s vocals and Drake’s verse. Passion, Pain and Pleasure closes with three cuts that embody the theme of the album emphatically. “Unfortunate,” wallows towards Prince territory with its drawn out hooks and echoing chorus; “Blind,” carries with it a rock and roll sound that fits the tale Trey sings about and “You Just Need Me,” resounds in a top 40 format and puts the final touch on the album.
Passion, Pain and Pleasure is no Ready and while it may be compared to its predecessor; Trey Songz manages to keep the listener’s attention throughout. Trey Songz worked with several producers on this album such as Troy Taylor, Mario Winans and Bryan-Michael Cox. The album’s sound is distinct and adds gravity to the singer’s repertoire of work.
Passion, Pain and Pleasure receives a PARLÉ
Rating:
P…Horrible
PA…Tolerable
PAR…Good
PARL…Kinda Great
PARLÉ…Classic
Also Check Out: is Trey Songz’ fourth studio album. Leading with a ballad “Love Faces,” Trey sets the tone for the entire project flowing back and forth between his vocals and an R. Kelly sound that despite it’s over usage, actually works. The following track, “Massage,” is the album’s quiet storm moment that is destined to become a favorite among fans of the singer and those embarking on a journey into the artists’ music. “Massage,” follows the mood of “Invented Sex” from his Grammy nominated , but suits his vocals a little better with percussion and piano breezing by in the background.

Passion, Pain & Pleasure is Trey Songz’ fourth studio album. Leading with a ballad “Love Faces,” Trey sets the tone for the entire project flowing back and forth between his vocals and an R. Kelly sound that despite it’s over usage, actually works. The following track, “Massage,” is the album’s quiet storm moment that is destined to become a favorite among fans of the singer and those embarking on a journey into the artists’ music. “Massage,” follows the mood of “Invented Sex” from his Grammy nominated Ready, but suits his vocals a little better with percussion and piano breezing by in the background.

The lead single “Bottoms Up,” offers a club vibe and features Young Money rapper, Nicki Minaj. At first listen, it becomes one of the most memorable off of the seventeen cut collection as does “Can’t Be Friends,” where Trey sings his heart out about a love turned friendship that can be no more. “Please Return My Call,” continues the same saga of yearned romance while “Red Lipstick,” adds to the album title’s momentum with its bedroom swag, as does “Doorbell.”

“The Unusual,” fits the inevitable radio friendly format with rapper Drake adding to the cut. Despite its radio attractiveness, the beat borders on bizarre and distracts from the lyricism of Trey’s vocals and Drake’s verse. Passion, Pain & Pleasure closes with three cuts that embody the theme of the album emphatically. “Unfortunate,” wallows towards Prince territory with its drawn out hooks and echoing chorus; “Blind,” carries with it a rock and roll sound that fits the tale Trey sings about and “You Just Need Me,” resounds in a top 40 format and puts the final touch on the album.

Passion, Pain & Pleasure is no Ready and while it may be compared to its predecessor; Trey Songz manages to keep the listener’s attention throughout. Trey Songz worked with several producers on this album such as Troy Taylor, Mario Winans and Bryan-Michael Cox. The album’s sound is distinct and adds gravity to the singer’s repertoire of work.

 

Passion, Pain & Pleasure receives a PARL

 

Rating:
P…Horrible
PA…Tolerable
PAR…Good
PARL…Kinda Great
PARLÉ…Classic

 

Trey Songz – Love Me Better

 

 

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