Jumping The Broom… movie review

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Yesterday I paid $10.00 to see the latest black film, not made by the illustrious Tyler Perry and you know what, it was actually pretty decent. The first feature film by director Salim Akil (Girlfriends, The Game) staring Paula Patton (Just Wright, Precious) as Sabrina Watkins and Laz Alonso (Avatar, Stomp The Yard) as her groom to be Jason Taylor was a breath of fresh air in a time where black movies are either over-saturated with religious themes and cross dressing or ninety minutes of explosions and gunfire. This film, reminiscent of The Cosby Show era shows a successful young black couple that is unpretentious as they are cute. Professional reasons provide a realistic motive for what would otherwise be interpreted as a five-star shotgun wedding being given by the bride’s wealthy parents played by Angela Basset (Waiting To Exhale) and Brian Stokes Mitchell (Ragtime, Man of la Mancha). The groom is the product of a single-parent household, raised by his widowed mother in Brooklyn played by Loretta Devine (Waiting to Exhale, For Colored Girls).
As a whole the cast, which included Mike Epps, Pooch Hall, Meagan Good and Gary Dourdan was a variable cornucopia of talent and entertainment. Their performances were entirely believable and I found myself able to relate to them with extreme ease, allowing the fourth wall to crumble and feeling like just another guest of the family.
Set in Martha’s Vineyard, the film tells the classic story of the “haves” vs. the “have-nots” and explores the vast cultural divide between wealthy blacks and their working class counterparts. Throughout history there has always been an evident dissociation between the two classes and this time there is no exception. One side is perceived to be too white washed and snobby, the other ghetto and uncouth. The end result just goes to show that nobody is perfect, regardless of his or her social status or background.
Despite being directed by a man, the film manages to hold on to its femininity and smoothness, which I believe comes from the female screenwriting duo of Elizabeth Hunter (Fighting Temptations, Beauty Shop) and Arlene Gibbs. The story is wall paced without moving too quickly while the dialogue remains age and gender appropriate. There’s absolutely nothing worse than a masculine character that speaks like an overgrown teenage girl. Overall, the balance between the sexes is well placed leaving this a perfect film for a date or a night out with friends. But be forewarned, if you’re expecting stereotypes, this film may not be for you. It works because it’s honest and real, which this day is all any of us can hope for.

Yesterday I paid $10.00 to see the latest Black film, not made by the illustrious Tyler Perry and you know what… it was actually pretty decent. The first feature film by director Salim Akil (Girlfriends, The Game) starring Paula Patton (Just Wright, Precious) as Sabrina Watkins and Laz Alonso (Avatar, Stomp The Yard) as her groom to be, Jason Taylor.  The movie was a breath of fresh air in a time where Black movies are either over-saturated with religious themes and cross dressing or ninety minutes of explosions and gunfire.

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This film, reminiscent of The Cosby Show era shows a successful young black couple that is unpretentious as they are cute. Professional reasons provide a realistic motive for what would otherwise be interpreted as a five-star shotgun wedding being given by the bride’s wealthy parents played by Angela Bassett (Waiting To Exhale) and Brian Stokes Mitchell (Ragtime, Man of la Mancha). The groom is the product of a single-parent household, raised by his widowed mother in Brooklyn played by Loretta Devine (Waiting to Exhale, For Colored Girls). As a whole the cast, which included Mike Epps, Pooch Hall, Meagan Good and Gary Dourdan was a variable cornucopia of talent and entertainment. Their performances were entirely believable and I found myself able to relate to them with extreme ease, allowing the fourth wall to crumble and feeling like just another guest of the family. 

 

Set in Martha’s Vineyard, the film tells the classic story of the “haves” vs. the “have-nots” and explores the vast cultural divide between wealthy Blacks and their working class counterparts. Throughout history there has always been an evident dissociation between the two classes and this time there is no exception. One side is perceived to be too white washed and snobby, the other ghetto and uncouth. The end result just goes to show that nobody is perfect, regardless of his or her social status or background.

 

 Despite being directed by a man, the film manages to hold on to its femininity and smoothness, which I believe comes from the female screenwriting duo of Elizabeth Hunter (Fighting Temptations, Beauty Shop) and Arlene Gibbs. The story is wall paced without moving too quickly while the dialogue remains age and gender appropriate. There’s absolutely nothing worse than a masculine character that speaks like an overgrown teenage girl. Overall, the balance between the sexes is well placed leaving this a perfect film for a date or a night out with friends. But be forewarned, if you’re expecting stereotypes, this film may not be for you. It works because it’s honest and real, which this day is all any of us can hope for.

 

 

Jumping The Broom receives a PAR


 

Rating: 

P…Horrible

PA…Tolerable

PAR…Good

PARL…Kinda Great

PARLÉ…Classic

 

 

 

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