Lil Wayne Tha Carter IV album review

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Tha Carter IV album review
It was hard not to compare Tha Carter IV to the previous release in Tha Carter series, but it nevertheless occurred. Having followed Lil Wayne since he began his Cash Money Records rite of passage, it has been interesting to say the least to hear and see his progression as an artist.
Tha Carter IV’s sound is polished, its bars and verses are as non-sensical and on fire as only Wayne can deliver, but throughout it feels as though something is missing. The deluxe version combines eighteen songs that are worthy of attention despite the lackluster finish that prior albums in the series have incorporated. “Blunt Blowin,” sets the tone for Tha Carter IV: a reflection into Wayne’s life and success as Tunechi discusses his money and vanity. “Megaman,” feels mixtapish and has Lil Wayne spitting off the wall salvos.
“6 foot 7 foot,” the album’s first single returns listeners to the ghost of Wayne past with its hard hitters, one-liners and verbal vocalizations with Corey Gunz catapulting Molotovs inside a Bangladesh sonic stronghold. “Nightmares on the Bottom,” which was performed live on MTV’s Unplugged, has Lil Wayne traipses into deep thought. The song is one of the standouts on Tha Carter IV as is “She Will,” where Drake joins Lil Wayne to make the album’s highest charter on the Billboard Hot 100. It bears repeating over and over and over, shadowing itself as an upscale “Lollipop.”
The serenading “How to Love,” is complete with whiny autotune and Lil Wayne soapbox as he proclaims what his former mate hasn’t learned.  “It’s Good,” has Drake and Jadakiss along for Tha Carter IV jaunt, with them supposedly chopping beef and causing indirect ruckus with Jay-Z.
Tha Carter IV is the ninth project from Lil Wayne. The collection will probably garner Wayne some platinum for its rhymes and guest stars but does not equate to the bling he’s shined on the public thus far.
Prime Cuts: “Megaman,”“6 feet 7 foot,” “Nightmares on the Bottom,” “She Will,” & “Mirror”
The Carter IV receives a PARL
Rating:
P…Horrible
PA…Tolerable
PAR…Good
PARL…Kinda Great
PARLÉ… Classic
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It was hard not to compare Tha Carter IV to the previous release in Tha Carter series, but it nevertheless occurred. Having followed Lil Wayne since he began his Cash Money Records rite of passage, it has been interesting to say the least to hear and see his progression as an artist.

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Tha Carter IV’s sound is polished, its bars and verses are as non-sensical and on fire as only Wayne can deliver, but throughout it feels as though something is missing. The deluxe version combines eighteen songs that are worthy of attention despite the lackluster finish that prior albums in the series have incorporated. “Blunt Blowin,” sets the tone for Tha Carter IV: a reflection into Wayne’s life and success as Tunechi discusses his money and vanity. “Megaman,” feels mixtapish and has Lil Wayne spitting off the wall salvos.

“6 foot 7 foot,” the album’s first single returns listeners to the ghost of Wayne past with its hard hitters, one-liners and verbal vocalizations with Corey Gunz catapulting Molotovs inside a Bangladesh sonic stronghold. “Nightmares on the Bottom,” which was performed live on MTV’s Unplugged, has Lil Wayne traipses into deep thought. The song is one of the standouts on Tha Carter IV as is “She Will,” where Drake joins Lil Wayne to make the album’s highest charter on the Billboard Hot 100. It bears repeating over and over and over, shadowing itself as an upscale “Lollipop.”

The serenading “How to Love,” is complete with whiny autotune and Lil Wayne soapbox as he proclaims what his former mate hasn’t learned.  “It’s Good,” has Drake and Jadakiss along for Tha Carter IV jaunt, with them supposedly chopping beef and causing indirect ruckus with Jay-Z.

Tha Carter IV is the ninth project from Lil Wayne. The collection will probably garner Wayne some platinum for its rhymes and guest stars but does not equate to the bling he’s shined on the public thus far.

 

Prime Cuts: “Megaman,”“6 feet 7 foot,” “Nightmares on the Bottom,” “She Will,” & “Mirror”

 

The Carter IV receives a PARL

 

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