Pariah… movie review

It’s been a full 24 hours since I watched the screening of the film Pariah, and I’m still thinking about the movie and analyzing scenes. The Focus Features film, written and directed by Dee Rees is sure to have a similar impact on all audiences when it opens up for limited release in New York and California on —
Pariah features breakout performances by several new faces to the big screen including the star, (Alike) Adepero Oduye, her best friend, (Laura) Pernell Walker, her father (Charles Parnell) amonst several surprising supporting cast members. Kim Wayans, who plays the mother to the lead character is the movie’s only well known face, which is just amazing considering how well all the actors performed.
The film is about a growing teenager, Alike, who is coming into her own, trying to express herself as the person she truly feels she has become. Just 17, years old, she has to deal with everything any other teen has to deal with in school–peer pressure, home work, making friends, family drama but, in addition she’s also trying to accept her own sexuality. With a God fearing, unaccepting mother, this tasks becomes even more difficult.
The story line has probably been done before, but I’ve never experienced it. In fact, its been a while since I’ve watched a film that felt so real and true to life. It reminded me of girls I went to high school with and I have no doubt that young girls and boys deal with the same issues daily.
The film has already impressed at the Sundance Film Festival 2011. It also helps to be able to list Spike Lee among of list of Executive Producers. The soundtrack for the film is another highlight, spotlighting several new and upcoming artists. The last thing I’ll highlight is the Director’s decision to spotlight all the actresses with their natural hair.  Of course the little tidbit was pointed out to me by my female co-worker about halfway through the film, but once noticing its hard not appreciate it, especially in an age many young women are struggling with trying to become natural. Pariah serves as a canvas of beautiful Black women of all ages, complexions, and hair styles.
Do yourself the favor and check out this film. Not just to support Black arts, but to support an all around great body of work.
Pariah receives a PARL
Rating:
P…Horrible
PA…Tolerable
PAR…Good
PARL…Kinda Great
PARLÉ… Classic
Also Check Out:

It’s been a full 24 hours since I watched the screening of the film Pariah, and I’m still thinking about the movie and analyzing scenes in my mind. The Focus Features film, written and directed by Dee Rees is sure to have a similar impact on all audiences when it opens up for limited release in New York, San Francisco & LA on  December 28th.  Pariah features breakout performances by several new faces to the big screen including the star, (Alike) Adepero Oduye, her best friend, (Laura) Pernell Walker, her father (Charles Parnell) amonst several surprising supporting cast members. Kim Wayans, who plays the mother to the lead character is the movie’s most well known face, which is just amazing considering how well all the actors performed.

The film is about a growing teenager, Alike, who is coming into her own, trying to express herself as the person she truly feels she has become. Just 17, years old, she has to deal with everything any other teen has to deal with–school, peer pressure, home work, making friends, family drama and in addition she’s also trying to accept her own sexuality. With a God fearing, unaccepting mother, this tasks becomes even more difficult. 

The story line has probably been done before, but I’ve never experienced it. In fact, its been a while since I’ve watched a film that felt so real and true to life. It reminded me of girls I went to high school with and I have no doubt that young girls and boys deal with the same issues daily. 

The film has already impressed at the Sundance Film Festival 2011. It also helps to be able to list Spike Lee among a list of Executive Producers. The soundtrack for the film is another highlight, spotlighting several new and upcoming artists. The last thing I’ll mention is the Director’s decision to spotlight all the actresses with their natural hair.  Of course the little tidbit was pointed out to me by my female co-worker about halfway through the film, but once noticing, its hard not appreciate it, especially in an age many young women are struggling with trying to become natural. Pariah serves as a canvas of beautiful Black women of all ages, complexions, and hair styles. 

Do yourself the favor and check out this film. Not just to support Black arts, but to support an all around great body of work. 

 

Pariah receives a PARL

Rating:

P…Horrible

PA…Tolerable

PAR…Good

PARL…Kinda Great

PARLÉ… Classic   

 

Also Check Out:

What My Husband Doesn’t Know… DVD review

Phalana Tiller – An Actress To Follow

Urbanworld Film Festival winner – Mamitas… movie review

Michole White – Following Her Passion To Act

All Things Fall Apart… 50 Cent movie review

Kevin Benoit

Kevin Benoit graduated from John Jay College of Criminal Justice in 2007 with a Bachelors of Science in Legal Studies. Empowering the urban community has been a goal for Kevin Benoit for the past 8 years. As a freshman in college, in May of 2004, Benoit created Parlé Magazine, an urban entertainment magazine that focused on literacy through entertainment. The publication has since provided a stepping-stone for many individuals throughout the country, from teens to adults and continues to provide inspiration for inspiring entrepreneurs, writers, photographers and graphic designers. Read more articles by Kevin.

Kevin Benoit has 271 posts and counting. See all posts by Kevin Benoit

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