Rihanna Talk That Talk album review

862
talk that talk album review
Talk That Talk is seductive and sassy, with a touch of piercing rhythms. It is as if Rihanna is content inhabiting a playground of techno beats, up-tempo Caribbean numbers and grinding synths that clatter, growl and snare, leaving a billowing image that is flirtatious and intoxicating. The opener to Talk That Talk, “You Da One,” is embossed in an island melody backed with a dubstep beat provided by Dr. Luke, who has produced chart topping songs for Katy Perry and Pink. “We Found Love,” drips with electronic house elements in a relaxed atmosphere. While at times, it feels like a Loud leftover due to the repetitive bubblegum jubilation, it has provided Rihanna yet another #1.
The title track features Jay-Z and a masterfully done beat provided by a sample from Notorious B.I.G. and the Stargate audio essence. Possibly “Umbrella” part deux, the song has Rihanna delivering the written words with ease.  She displays a similar feisty tone on “Cockiness (Love It)” a short rap and dancehall styled banger.  “Birthday Cake,” finds Rihanna using double entendres before cutting to the chase with her intentions.
Both “We All Want Love & “Drunk on Love,” embody the same magic that Rihanna adds to her lower grooves. The former reaches hippy-esque qualities to the point where the listener can envision Rihanna dancing in fields of love amidst a clichéd message that somehow manages to work among the scorching perception Talk That Talk echoes. The latter, finds her trying to out sing the music provided.
“Farewell,” is a fitting finish to an album that presents a brand new Rihanna. Gone is the morbid and dark exhibition presented on Rated R and the euphoria of Loud. What remains is a mischievous, enticing and sultry pop superstar whose adventures lie in a risqué storybook that uses a proven winning formula.
Prime Cuts:  “You Da One,” “Where Have You Been,” & “Talk That Talk”
Talk That Talk receives a PAR
Rating:
P…Horrible
PA…Tolerable
PAR…Good
PARL…Kinda Great
PARLÉ… Classic
Also Check Out:

Talk That Talk is seductive and sassy, with a touch of piercing rhythms. It is as if Rihanna is content inhabiting a playground of techno beats, up-tempo Caribbean numbers and grinding synths that clatter, growl and snare, leaving a billowing image that is flirtatious and intoxicating. The opener to Talk That Talk, “You Da One,” is embossed in an island melody backed with a dubstep beat provided by Dr. Luke, who has produced chart topping songs for Katy Perry and Pink. “We Found Love,” drips with electronic house elements in a relaxed atmosphere. While at times, it feels like a Loud leftover due to the repetitive bubblegum jubilation, it has provided Rihanna yet another #1.

Banner Solitairesocial 300 x 300


The title track features Jay-Z and a masterfully done beat provided by a sample from Notorious B.I.G. and the Stargate audio essence. Possibly “Umbrella” part deux, the song has Rihanna delivering the written words with ease.  She displays a similar feisty tone on “Cockiness (Love It)” a short rap and dancehall styled banger.  “Birthday Cake,” finds Rihanna using double entendres before cutting to the chase with her intentions.

Both “We All Want Love” & “Drunk on Love,” embody the same magic that Rihanna adds to her lower grooves. The former reaches hippy-esque qualities to the point where the listener can envision Rihanna dancing in fields of love amidst a clichéd message that somehow manages to work among the scorching perception Talk That Talk echoes. The latter, finds her trying to out sing the music provided.

“Farewell,” is a fitting finish to an album that presents a brand new Rihanna. Gone is the morbid and dark exhibition presented on Rated R and the euphoria of Loud. What remains is a mischievous, enticing and sultry pop superstar whose adventures lie in a risqué storybook that uses a proven winning formula.

Prime Cuts:  “You Da One,” “Where Have You Been,” & “Talk That Talk”

Talk That Talk receives a PAR

 

Also Check Out:
Next Out The West – Nipsey Hussle Interview
Rihanna Anti album review